Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Why aren't we teaching multiplication tables?

It's not so much that we don't teach it, they don't practice it. Then there are the awful 'new math' text books, whereby kids use Discovery Learning to figure out that there ARE things like time saving times tables.

 I had strategies, despite the fact that 'kill and drill' were supposed to be passé.

Of course, the issue is with the text books, which want us to use the discovery method of learning that it is easier to memorize them. I didn't like letting them use calculators. That's just lazy and time consuming.

The kids most at risk won't learn them without some intervention. That was made fun in my classrooms.
I created a chart, each student had the opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of each number.
Week one, we would begin with the 2's.
Each student would come up to the front of the room, bounce a basketball and recite 2, 4, 6, 8, and once done, they would get a star.
The ball kept them going, at a predictable rate of speed. If they couldn't keep up, they would sit down, and the next student would try. They could go to the end of the line.
The beauty of this was that if a kid wasn't ready, they would hear more of their peers reciting it, and would often learn it from simply listening.
Week 3, the keeners would want to go to the 3 times tables.
I taught the kids the trick with the 9 times tables. They thought that was so cool!

Ontario Curriculum:

Grade 2: Number Sense and Numeration

Overall Expectations By the end of Grade 2, students will: • read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100, and use concrete materials to represent fractions and money amounts to 100¢; • demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward to 200 and backwards from 50, using multiples of various numbers as starting points;

Grade 3: Number Sense and Numeration

Overall Expectations By the end of Grade 3, students will: • read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 1000, and use concrete materials to represent fractions and money amounts to $10; • demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward and backwards by various numbers and from various starting points; • solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of single- and multi-digit whole numbers, using a variety of strategies, and demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division.
– multiply to 7 x 7 and divide to 49 ÷ 7, using a variety of mental strategies (e.g., doubles, doubles plus another set, skip
counting).

Grade 4

– multiply to 9 x 9 and divide to 81 ÷ 9, using a variety of mental strategies (e.g., doubles, doubles plus another set, skip
counting);

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